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Jacob Johnson
Jacob Johnson

Buy Private Vpn ##BEST##


All of our servers are protected with 2048-bit military grade encryption. This ensures that all of your online activities, data, and private information are untraceable and protected from general spyware to malicious cyber criminals. Additionally, our IPv6 leak protection ensures that even if you are suddenly disconnected from your VPN, your identity remains secure.




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In CNET's previous coverage of virtual private networks, we've praised CyberGhost for its roster of competitive features. Our in-depth review of CyberGhost in 2019 included speed testing, security verification and an analysis of its full suite of privacy tools. Since then, the VPN company has increased its number of servers and is prepared to roll out new privacy tools, all while remaining one of the cheapest VPNs we've reviewed -- at $2.03 per month for a two-year plan.


A commercial virtual private network is technology that allows you to create a private connection over a less private network by creating an encrypted tunnel between your computer and the internet. You can install a VPN just like you would any other app or program on your smartphone or computer. A VPN can let you get around censorship in your country or access georestricted media content from another country -- and prevents your internet service provider from being able to intrude on your privacy by snooping on your web browsing. VPNs do this by allowing you to appear as though you're connecting from a different location or country.


Anyone who accesses the internet from a computer, tablet or smartphone can benefit from using a VPN. You don't have to be an activist, government dissident or journalist to need a VPN; the rise of third-party data brokers, cross-site advertising trackers, IP address collection and mobile geo-targeting have all combined to create an online browsing environment that poses significant threats to everyday users' basic privacy. Because a VPN encrypts your connection, your browsing data is protected from your internet service provider (and any government entities who request your ISP data), and your network administrator in most cases. A VPN can also shield your private information -- like passwords, usernames and bank or shopping details -- from anyone snooping on your network.


A VPN, or virtual private network, is a service that encrypts your activity on the internet and keeps your identity hidden while browsing. VPNs provide an extra layer of privacy, enable you to access foreign websites and can provide secure connections for transferring sensitive information.


  • Businesses can use a VPN for two main things: secure access to the internet and connecting to a company server where employees can securely access files, apps, and other company resources.\nA VPN creates an encrypted connection over the internet between two devices, typically a smartphone or laptop and a server. The encryption prevents third parties such as hackers, governments, and internet service providers from snooping on data as it passes between these two devices. This is particularly useful for remote employees who need secure internet access from unprotected networks at hotels, airports, and cafes.\nA VPN can also allow staff to safely access files, documents, apps, printers, and other resources on the VPN server as if they were on a local network. For instance, an employee could connect to an app on the VPN server to write and edit documents without ever downloading those documents to their own device.","author":"@type":"Person","name":"Paul Bischoff","description":"Paul is Comparitech\u2019s editor and a regular commentator on cyber security and privacy topics in national and international media including New York Times, BBC, Forbes, The Guardian and many others. He's been writing about the tech industry since 2012 for publications like Tech in Asia, Mashable, and various startup blogs. \nPaul has an in-depth knowledge of VPNs, having been an early adopter while looking to access the open internet during this time in China.\nHe previously worked in Beijing as an editor for Tech in Asia, and has been writing and reporting on technology for the last decade. He has also volunteered as a teacher for older adults learning basic tech literacy and cyber awareness. You can find him on Twitter at @pabischoff.\n","url":"https:\/\/www.comparitech.com\/author\/paul-bischoff\/"}},"@type":"Question","name":"How do I set up a VPN for my business?","answerCount":1,"acceptedAnswer":"@type":"Answer","text":"Setting up a VPN is pretty easy. Employees will need to download the VPN provider's app on their laptop and\/or smartphone. They can then use the app to connect to the VPN server, which will encrypt all of the data before it leaves the device.\nIf you're running your own VPN server, you can store files or host apps on it that employees can only access while connected. You'll need some way to manage user credentials---either passwords or some other sort of key. Thankfully, the business-oriented VPNs we recommend above will take care of most of this for you.","author":"@type":"Person","name":"Paul Bischoff","description":"Paul is Comparitech\u2019s editor and a regular commentator on cyber security and privacy topics in national and international media including New York Times, BBC, Forbes, The Guardian and many others. He's been writing about the tech industry since 2012 for publications like Tech in Asia, Mashable, and various startup blogs. \nPaul has an in-depth knowledge of VPNs, having been an early adopter while looking to access the open internet during this time in China.\nHe previously worked in Beijing as an editor for Tech in Asia, and has been writing and reporting on technology for the last decade. He has also volunteered as a teacher for older adults learning basic tech literacy and cyber awareness. You can find him on Twitter at @pabischoff.\n","url":"https:\/\/www.comparitech.com\/author\/paul-bischoff\/","@type":"Question","name":"Should I use a free business VPN?","answerCount":1,"acceptedAnswer":"@type":"Answer","text":"A free VPN service sounds like an attractive option for businesses looking to cut back on expenses and avoid unnecessary overheads. But we must warn you that this process entails a significant degree of risk.\nFree VPNs won\u2019t have large server networks spread across the world, stringent encryption standards, or speedy connections that are a staple with paid options. The weak encryption means your business might be susceptible to a hacking attempt and a real threat of data loss. Slow speeds will result in longer wait times for file transfers or connections to remote company servers.\nIn some cases, free VPN services have also forcefully inserted tracking cookies, mined user data, and sold it to advertisers for a profit. We\u2019re pretty sure you wouldn\u2019t want that to happen to your employees which is why we think it\u2019s in your best interest to skip them.","author":"@type":"Person","name":"Paul Bischoff","description":"Paul is Comparitech\u2019s editor and a regular commentator on cyber security and privacy topics in national and international media including New York Times, BBC, Forbes, The Guardian and many others. He's been writing about the tech industry since 2012 for publications like Tech in Asia, Mashable, and various startup blogs. \nPaul has an in-depth knowledge of VPNs, having been an early adopter while looking to access the open internet during this time in China.\nHe previously worked in Beijing as an editor for Tech in Asia, and has been writing and reporting on technology for the last decade. He has also volunteered as a teacher for older adults learning basic tech literacy and cyber awareness. You can find him on Twitter at @pabischoff.\n","url":"https:\/\/www.comparitech.com\/author\/paul-bischoff\/","@type":"Question","name":"How do VPNs protect remote employees?","answerCount":1,"acceptedAnswer":"@type":"Answer","text":"The internet has helped break down barriers to communication, bring people closer together, and democratize access to information. Businesses are no longer restricted to the talent available in their city\/town - they can scour the globe for employees and use remote workers to scale.\nSuch trends are now catching on. Currently, it is estimated that about\u00a02.8 percent of the global workforce now works from home. The figure represents an increase of 105% from 2005. And after the COVID-19 pandemic, the demand for remote work looks very likely to increase.\nFor businesses that hire remote workers, it\u2019s crucial that their data is protected and encrypted. This keeps it away from any malicious entity that might be trying to snoop in. A VPN will help mitigate these risks to a considerable degree.\nAt the same time, employees are traveling for off-site meetings, sales visits, and other business needs. They might be connecting to public wifi in coffee shops, malls, hotels, or cafes. Such networks aren\u2019t considered to be incredibly secure. Hundreds of people are connected at any given time, representing a security hazard.\nRead our guide\u00a0on how to navigate public wifi networks safely and securely.\nAnother factor to consider is the rising threat of cybercrime - specifically corporate espionage. The most common ways of achieving this are email and credit card theft with hackers keen to target the weakest links in the chain. These are mainly employees that use their personal phones for business tasks as well as other unsecured devices connected to the network.\nIn 2014, more than 16 million mobile devices worldwide were infected by malware\u00a0according\u00a0to Alcatel-Lucent\u2019s Motive Security Labs. Companies lost over US$400 billion to cybercrime the same year. A routine method is for hackers to try and target smartphones as a way of entering the system. From there they can breach firewalls and carry out denial-of-service attacks to steal data.\nIt's not just large companies coming under attack and small businesses are feeling the impact too. A Malwarebytes ransomware report revealed findings that 22% of small businesses hit by ransomware attacks actually had to immediately cease operations.\nIn such a scenario it makes perfect sense to cough up a few dollars each month to secure your business. As long as your employees have VPN apps installed on their laptops and phones you can sleep easier at night.","author":"@type":"Person","name":"Paul Bischoff","description":"Paul is Comparitech\u2019s editor and a regular commentator on cyber security and privacy topics in national and international media including New York Times, BBC, Forbes, The Guardian and many others. He's been writing about the tech industry since 2012 for publications like Tech in Asia, Mashable, and various startup blogs. \nPaul has an in-depth knowledge of VPNs, having been an early adopter while looking to access the open internet during this time in China.\nHe previously worked in Beijing as an editor for Tech in Asia, and has been writing and reporting on technology for the last decade. He has also volunteered as a teacher for older adults learning basic tech literacy and cyber awareness. You can find him on Twitter at @pabischoff.\n","url":"https:\/\/www.comparitech.com\/author\/paul-bischoff\/","@type":"Question","name":"What should I look for in a business VPN?","answerCount":1,"acceptedAnswer":"@type":"Answer","text":"First off, we recommend you use a VPN that is intended specifically for business use. This will ensure it has the necessary functionality and security, and meets regulatory compliance standards.\nBusinesses should consider a few factors when weighing different VPN options:\n\nCloud or self-hosted? Most of the VPNs we recommend above operate in the cloud. This makes them much easier to set up, manage, and scale. You can host files and apps on the cloud VPN server, which employees can remotely access using VPN apps. Alternatively, you can host your own VPN server either in the cloud or on-site, but know that doing so will require more IT resources and expertise.\nA good dashboard. It might seem superficial, but a well-designed dashboard for managing VPN accounts and access privileges across your business will go a long way in keeping employees connected and secured.\nSite-to-site: Employees aren't the only ones who can use a VPN. You can create a secure tunnel between two networks with a VPN as well. This is called a site-to-site VPN, and it's useful for businesses with multiple offices, for instance.\nScalability: If you plan on going on a hiring spree, make sure your VPN can keep up. Adding and removing access and accounts to the VPN server should be easy. Keep an eye on the price as well.\nSecurity: This goes without saying, but be sure to choose a secure VPN. That means strong encryption, leak prevention, authentication, and a no-logs policy from the VPN provider. Keep an eye out for features like two-factor authentication, perfect forward secrecy, and modern, open-source VPN protocols.\nSegmentation: By dividing your network into smaller parts, you can better protect critical data while still allowing access to other files and apps.\nSupport: If you're choosing one of the VPNs we recommended, you probably aren't certified as a network administrator. That means you might encounter issues for which you'll need help. Be sure to choose a VPN with knowledgeable and prompt---preferably live---customer support. Some support is limited to the business hours of the country in which the VPN is based, so be sure to check when support is available.\n","author":"@type":"Person","name":"Paul Bischoff","description":"Paul is Comparitech\u2019s editor and a regular commentator on cyber security and privacy topics in national and international media including New York Times, BBC, Forbes, The Guardian and many others. He's been writing about the tech industry since 2012 for publications like Tech in Asia, Mashable, and various startup blogs. \nPaul has an in-depth knowledge of VPNs, having been an early adopter while looking to access the open internet during this time in China.\nHe previously worked in Beijing as an editor for Tech in Asia, and has been writing and reporting on technology for the last decade. He has also volunteered as a teacher for older adults learning basic tech literacy and cyber awareness. You can find him on Twitter at @pabischoff.\n","url":"https:\/\/www.comparitech.com\/author\/paul-bischoff\/","@type":"Question","name":"Business VPN alternatives","answerCount":1,"acceptedAnswer":"@type":"Answer","text":"For enterprise environments, VPNs might not be the most suitable solution. For site-to-site connections between geographically distant offices and data centers in particular, there exist several more modern alternatives:\n\nMPLS, or multi-protocol label switching, routes data using labels instead of public IP addresses. It makes traffic prioritization possible, is less vulnerable to insecure IP lookups, and generally suffers less latency than a site-to-site VPN.\nZTNA. Zero Trust Network Access solutions work on the application layer and, unlike VPNs, are independent of the network. Instead, users are connected directly to applications based on user verification and device posture. Applications are hidden from the internet, which reduces attack surface. This is the scheme used by Twingate.\nCloud VPN. Set up using SD-WAN (software-defined wide are networkig), cloud VPNs can be faster, more secure, and require less maintenance than traditional VPNs. SD-WAN cloud VPNs are best implemented with SASE, or secure access service edge, which gives the organization a single, centralized view of the entire network.\nLeased circuits, also known as leased lines, are permanent and private connections between two or more locations. Leased circuits are expensive and only applicable to very large enterprises.\n","author":"@type":"Person","name":"Paul Bischoff","description":"Paul is Comparitech\u2019s editor and a regular commentator on cyber security and privacy topics in national and international media including New York Times, BBC, Forbes, The Guardian and many others. He's been writing about the tech industry since 2012 for publications like Tech in Asia, Mashable, and various startup blogs. \nPaul has an in-depth knowledge of VPNs, having been an early adopter while looking to access the open internet during this time in China.\nHe previously worked in Beijing as an editor for Tech in Asia, and has been writing and reporting on technology for the last decade. He has also volunteered as a teacher for older adults learning basic tech literacy and cyber awareness. You can find him on Twitter at @pabischoff.\n","url":"https:\/\/www.comparitech.com\/author\/paul-bischoff\/"]} "@context":"http:\/\/schema.org","@type":"BreadcrumbList","itemListElement":["@type":"ListItem","position":1,"name":"Home","item":"https:\/\/www.comparitech.com\/","@type":"ListItem","position":2,"name":"Blog","item":"https:\/\/www.comparitech.com\/blog\/","@type":"ListItem","position":3,"name":"VPN & Privacy","item":"https:\/\/www.comparitech.com\/blog\/vpn-privacy\/","@type":"ListItem","position":4,"name":"Business VPNS","item":"https:\/\/www.comparitech.com\/blog\/vpn-privacy\/business-vpn\/"]Blog

VPN & PrivacyBusiness VPNS We are funded by our readers and may receive a commission when you buy using links on our site. Best VPN for businesses in 2023 and some to avoid With more people than ever working remotely, business VPNs have never been more popular. We take a look at the best VPNs for small business. Paul Bischoff TECH WRITER, PRIVACY ADVOCATE AND VPN EXPERT @pabischoff UPDATED: February 14, 2023 body.single .section.main-content.sidebar-active .col.grid-item.sidebar.span_1_of_3 float: right; body.single .section.main-content.sidebar-active .col.grid-item.content.span_2_of_3 margin-left: 0; 041b061a72


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