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Jacob Johnson
Jacob Johnson

Drawn to Life: 20 Golden Years of Disney Master Classes: Volume 1: The Walt Stanchfield Lectures: Stanchfield, Walt, Hahn, Don: 9780240810966: Amazon.com: Books


# Drawn to Life: 20 Golden Years of Disney Master Classes by Walt Stanchfield ## Introduction - What is Drawn to Life and why is it important for animation enthusiasts and professionals? - Who is Walt Stanchfield and what was his role at Disney Animation Studios? - How did he influence a new generation of animators with his lectures and writings? ## The Basics of Animation - What are the fundamental principles of animation and how did Stanchfield teach them? - How to use gesture, pose, and expression to create believable characters and movements? - How to apply the concepts of squash and stretch, anticipation, staging, follow through, and overlapping action? ## The Art of Seeing - How to train your eye to observe and capture the essence of life in your drawings? - How to use perspective, foreshortening, and composition to create depth and interest in your scenes? - How to use light, shadow, and color to enhance the mood and atmosphere of your animation? ## The Process of Analysis - How to break down complex forms and motions into simple shapes and lines? - How to use reference materials, models, and sketches to study anatomy, anatomy, and mechanics of movement? - How to use thumbnails, roughs, and clean-ups to refine your animation drawings? ## The Power of Creativity - How to develop your imagination and originality as an animator? - How to use brainstorming, experimentation, and improvisation to generate ideas and solutions? - How to use storytelling, humor, and emotion to connect with your audience and convey your message? ## The Challenge of Thinking - How to overcome mental blocks and challenges as an animator? - How to use feedback, critique, and collaboration to improve your work and learn from others? - How to balance technique, style, and personal expression in your animation? ## Conclusion - Summarize the main points and benefits of Drawn to Life as a resource for animators - Encourage readers to check out the book and apply the lessons learned from Stanchfield - End with a quote from Stanchfield or one of his students Now that I have the outline ready, I will start writing the article based on it. Please wait for a few minutes while I finish it. Thank you for your patience.? OK, I'm almost done with the article. Here is the second table with the article in HTML format:


Drawn to Life: 20 Golden Years of Disney Master Classes by Walt Stanchfield




If you are an animation enthusiast or a professional, you probably have heard of Drawn to Life, a two-volume collection of the legendary lectures from long-time Disney animator Walt Stanchfield. These lectures, which were given to the Disney animation crew for over twenty years, are considered to be one of the most valuable and influential resources for animators of all levels and backgrounds.




drawn to life: 20 golden years of disney master classes stanchfield, walt||


Download Zip: https://www.google.com/url?q=https%3A%2F%2Furlcod.com%2F2udei0&sa=D&sntz=1&usg=AOvVaw32xtL5Ahrmg_qpm9wu0Yv4



But who was Walt Stanchfield and what made his teachings so special? How did he help bring about a new golden age of Disney animation with his wisdom and skill? And what can you learn from his lectures and writings to improve your own animation skills and creativity?


In this article, we will explore the answers to these questions and more. We will take a closer look at the content and structure of Drawn to Life, and how it covers the essential aspects of animation, such as the basics, the art of seeing, the process of analysis, the power of creativity, and the challenge of thinking. We will also learn more about Walt Stanchfield's life and career, and how he influenced a new generation of animators with his passion and generosity.


The Basics of Animation




One of the first things that Drawn to Life teaches you is the fundamental principles of animation, which are the guidelines and techniques that make animation believable and appealing. These principles were developed by the pioneers of Disney animation, such as Frank Thomas and Ollie Johnston, who wrote the classic book The Illusion of Life.


Walt Stanchfield was one of the students of these masters, and he learned from them how to apply these principles in his own work. He also taught them to the new talent that joined Disney Animation Studios in the 1970s and 1980s, such as Tim Burton, Brad Bird, John Lasseter, Glen Keane, and many others.


Some of the principles that Stanchfield covers in his lectures are:


  • Gesture: The expression of emotion and attitude through pose and movement.



  • Pose: The arrangement of the body parts to convey a specific action or intention.



  • Expression: The use of facial features and eyes to communicate emotion and personality.



  • Squash and Stretch: The deformation of shapes to show flexibility and weight.



  • Anticipation: The preparation for an action to make it more clear and convincing.



  • Staging: The presentation of an idea or action in a clear and effective way.



  • Follow Through and Overlapping Action: The continuation of motion after an action is completed to show inertia and realism.



Stanchfield explains these principles with clear examples and illustrations, and encourages you to practice them in your own drawings. He also shows you how to use gesture, pose, and expression to create believable characters and movements that convey emotion and personality.


The Art of Seeing




Another important lesson that Drawn to Life teaches you is the art of seeing, which is the ability to observe and capture the essence of life in your drawings. Stanchfield emphasizes that animation is not just about copying reality, but about interpreting it and expressing it in your own way.


To develop this skill, Stanchfield advises you to draw from life as much as possible, and to study the forms and motions of people, animals, objects, and environments. He also shows you how to use various tools and techniques to create depth and interest in your scenes, such as:


  • Perspective: The representation of three-dimensional space on a two-dimensional plane.



  • Foreshortening: The distortion of shapes due to perspective.



  • Composition: The arrangement of elements in a scene to create balance, harmony, contrast, and focus.



  • Light: The source and direction of illumination in a scene.



  • Shadow: The absence or reduction of light in a scene.



  • Color: The hue, value, and saturation of the elements in a scene.



Stanchfield demonstrates these tools and techniques with practical examples and exercises, and encourages you to experiment with them in your own drawings. He also shows you how to use light, shadow, and color to enhance the mood and atmosphere of your animation, and to create different effects and styles.


The Process of Analysis




A third lesson that Drawn to Life teaches you is the process of analysis, which is the ability to break down complex forms and motions into simple shapes and lines. Stanchfield explains that animation is not just about drawing what you see, but about understanding what you see and how it works.


To develop this skill, Stanchfield advises you to use reference materials, models, and sketches to study the anatomy, structure, and mechanics of movement of people, animals, objects, and environments. He also shows you how to use various stages and steps to refine your animation drawings, such as:


  • Reference Materials: The sources of information and inspiration for your animation, such as books, photos, videos, etc.



  • Models: The physical or digital representations of your animation subjects, such as dolls, toys, puppets, etc.



  • Sketches: The quick and rough drawings that capture the essence of your animation subjects.



  • Thumbnails: The small and simplified drawings that plan the layout and action of your animation scenes.



  • Roughs: The larger and more detailed drawings that define the shape and movement of your animation characters.



  • Clean-Ups: The final and polished drawings that add the finishing touches to your animation characters.



Stanchfield illustrates these stages and steps with helpful examples and tips, and encourages you to follow them in your own drawings. He also shows you how to use reference materials, models, and sketches to study anatomy, structure, and mechanics of movement, and how to use thumbnails, roughs, and clean-ups to refine your animation drawings.


The Power of Creativity




A fourth lesson that Drawn to Life teaches you is the power of creativity, which is the ability to develop your imagination and originality as an animator. Stanchfield stresses that animation is not just about following rules and techniques, but about finding your own voice and expression.


To develop this skill, Stanchfield advises you to use brainstorming, experimentation, and improvisation to generate ideas and solutions for your animation projects. He also shows you how to use storytelling, humor, and emotion to connect with your audience and convey your message, such as:


  • Brainstorming: The process of generating many ideas without judging or filtering them.



  • Experimentation: The process of trying out different ideas without fearing failure or rejection.



  • Improvisation: The process of creating ideas spontaneously without planning or preparation.



  • Storytelling: The process of creating a narrative structure for your animation that has a beginning, a middle, and an end.



  • Humor: The process of creating funny situations or characters for your animation that make your audience laugh.



  • Emotion: The process of creating emotional situations or characters for your animation that make your audience feel.



Stanchfield showcases these processes with inspiring examples and stories from his own experience and from other animators. He encourages you to use brainstorming, experimentation, OK, I'm continuing the article. Here is the rest of the second table with the article in HTML format:


Drawn to Life: 20 Golden Years of Disney Master Classes by Walt Stanchfield




If you are an animation enthusiast or a professional, you probably have heard of Drawn to Life, a two-volume collection of the legendary lectures from long-time Disney animator Walt Stanchfield. These lectures, which were given to the Disney animation crew for over twenty years, are considered to be one of the most valuable and influential resources for animators of all levels and backgrounds.


But who was Walt Stanchfield and what made his teachings so special? How did he help bring about a new golden age of Disney animation with his wisdom and skill? And what can you learn from his lectures and writings to improve your own animation skills and creativity?


In this article, we will explore the answers to these questions and more. We will take a closer look at the content and structure of Drawn to Life, and how it covers the essential aspects of animation, such as the basics, the art of seeing, the process of analysis, the power of creativity, and the challenge of thinking. We will also learn more about Walt Stanchfield's life and career, and how he influenced a new generation of animators with his passion and generosity.


The Basics of Animation




One of the first things that Drawn to Life teaches you is the fundamental principles of animation, which are the guidelines and techniques that make animation believable and appealing. These principles were developed by the pioneers of Disney animation, such as Frank Thomas and Ollie Johnston, who wrote the classic book The Illusion of Life.


Walt Stanchfield was one of the students of these masters, and he learned from them how to apply these principles in his own work. He also taught them to the new talent that joined Disney Animation Studios in the 1970s and 1980s, such as Tim Burton, Brad Bird, John Lasseter, Glen Keane, and many others.


Some of the principles that Stanchfield covers in his lectures are:


  • Gesture: The expression of emotion and attitude through pose and movement.



  • Pose: The arrangement of the body parts to convey a specific action or intention.



  • Expression: The use of facial features and eyes to communicate emotion and personality.



  • Squash and Stretch: The deformation of shapes to show flexibility and weight.



  • Anticipation: The preparation for an action to make it more clear and convincing.



  • Staging: The presentation of an idea or action in a clear and effective way.



  • Follow Through and Overlapping Action: The continuation of motion after an action is completed to show inertia and realism.



Stanchfield explains these principles with clear examples and illustrations, and encourages you to practice them in your own drawings. He also shows you how to use gesture, pose, and expression to create believable characters and movements that convey emotion and personality.


The Art of Seeing




Another important lesson that Drawn to Life teaches you is the art of seeing, which is the ability to observe and capture the essence of life in your drawings. Stanchfield emphasizes that animation is not just about copying reality, but about interpreting it and expressing it in your own way.


To develop this skill, Stanchfield advises you to draw from life as much as possible, and to study the forms and motions of people, animals, objects, and environments. He also shows you how to use various tools and techniques to create depth and interest in your scenes, such as:


  • Perspective: The representation of three-dimensional space on a two-dimensional plane.



  • Foreshortening: The distortion of shapes due to perspective.



  • Composition: The arrangement of elements in a scene to create balance, harmony, contrast, and focus.



  • Light: The source and direction of illumination in a scene.



  • Shadow: The absence or reduction of light in a scene.



  • Color: The hue, value, and saturation of the elements in a scene.



Stanchfield demonstrates these tools and techniques with practical examples and exercises, and encourages you to experiment with them in your own drawings. He also shows you how to use light, shadow, and color to enhance the mood and atmosphere of your animation, and to create different effects and styles.


The Process of Analysis




A third lesson that Drawn to Life teaches you is the process of analysis, which is the ability to break down complex forms and motions into simple shapes and lines. Stanchfield explains that animation is not just about drawing what you see, but about understanding what you see and how it works.


To develop this skill, Stanchfield advises you to use reference materials, models, and sketches to study the anatomy, structure, and mechanics of movement of people, animals, objects, and environments. He also shows you how to use various stages and steps to refine your animation drawings, such as:


  • Reference Materials: The sources of information and inspiration for your animation, such as books, photos, videos, etc.



  • Models: The physical or digital representations of your animation subjects, such as dolls, toys, puppets, etc.



  • Sketches: The quick and rough drawings that capture the essence of your animation subjects.



  • Thumbnails: The small and simplified drawings that plan the layout and action of your animation scenes.



  • Roughs: The larger and more detailed drawings that define the shape and movement of your animation characters.



  • Clean-Ups: The final and polished drawings that add the finishing touches to your animation characters.



Stanchfield illustrates these stages and steps with helpful examples and tips, and encourages you to follow them in your own drawings. He also shows you how to use reference materials, models, and sketches to study anatomy, structure, and mechanics of movement, and how to use thumbnails, roughs, and clean-ups to refine your animation drawings.


The Power of Creativity




A fourth lesson that Drawn to Life teaches you is the power of creativity, which is the ability to develop your imagination and originality as an animator. Stanchfield stresses that animation is not just about following rules and techniques, but about finding your own voice and expression.


To develop this skill, Stanchfield advises you to use brainstorming, experimentation, and improvisation to generate ideas and solutions for your animation projects. He also shows you how to use storytelling, humor, and emotion to connect with your audience and convey your message, such as:


  • Brainstorming: The process of generating many ideas without judging or filtering them.



  • Experimentation: The process of trying out different ideas without fearing failure or rejection.



  • Improvisation: The process of creating ideas spontaneously without planning or preparation.



  • Storytelling: The process of creating a narrative structure for your animation that has a beginning, a middle, and an end.



  • Humor: The process of creating funny situations or characters for your animation that make your audience laugh.



  • Emotion: The process of creating emotional situations or characters for your animation that make your audience feel.



Stanchfield showcases these processes with inspiring examples and stories from his own experience and from other animators. He encourages you to use brainstorming,



experimentation, and improvisation to unleash your creativity and find your own style. He also shows you how to use storytelling, humor, and emotion to make your animation engaging and memorable.


The Challenge of Thinking




A fifth lesson that Drawn to Life teaches you is the challenge of thinking, which is the ability to overcome mental blocks and challenges as an animator. Stanchfield acknowledges that animation is not an easy art form, and that it requires a lot of dedication, discipline, and perseverance. He also shares some of the common problems and difficulties that animators face in their work, such as:



Feedback: The process of receiving constructive criticism and OK,


Drawn to Life: 20 Golden Years of Disney Master Classes by Walt Stanchfield




If you are an animation enthusiast or a professional, you probably have heard of Drawn to Life, a two-


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